F

Definition:

Abbreviation for Fine

 

 

Fair

Definition:

The grade FR-2.

 

 

Fake

Definition:

A counterfeit or altered coin.

 

 

Fantasy piece

Definition:

A term applied to coins struck at the whim of Mint officials. Examples include the various 1865 Motto and 1866 No Motto coins.

 

 

Fiat currency

Definition:

Coins or paper money that do not have metal value or are not backed by metal value.

 

 

Field

Definition:

The flat (or slightly curved) portion of a coin where there is no design.

 

 

Fine

Definition:

Term for the grades F-12 and F-15.

 

 

Finest known

Definition:

The best-known condition example of a particular numismatic item.

 

 

First strike

Definition:

A coin struck early in the life of a die. First strikes can be characterized by striated or mirror-like fields if the die was polished. First strikes are almost always fully or well struck, with crisp detail.

 

 

Flat luster

Definition:

A subdued type of gray or dull luster often seen on coins struck from worn dies.

 

 

Flip

Definition:

1. A clear, flexible plastic holder used to display and store coins. Also see: PVC.
2. To quickly sell a recently purchased item – usually for a fast profit.

 

 

Flip rub

Definition:

Discoloration, often only slight, on the highest points of a coin caused by contact with a flip.

 

 

Flow lines

Definition:

Lines, sometimes visible, resulting from the metal flowing outward from the center of a planchet as it is struck. Cartwheel lustre is the result of light reflecting from flow lines.

 

 

Focal area

Definition:

The area of a coin to which a viewer’s eye is drawn. Liberty’s cheek is the focal point of the Morgan Dollar.

 

 

FR

Definition:

Acronym for Fair.

 

 

Friction

Definition:

A disturbance which appears either on the high-points of a coin or in the fields, as a result of that coin rubbing against other objects. A coin is said to have friction when only the lustre is disturbed, and no actual wear of the metal is visible to the naked eye.

 

 

Frost

Definition:

An effect seen on the raised parts of a coin whereby the metal appears crystallized.

 

 

Frosted devices

Definition:

Raised elements on coins struck with treated dies to impart a crystallized appearance.

 

 

Full strike

Definition:

A numismatic item that has full detail. The metal flows into all areas of the die.

 

 

Galvano

Definition:

The large metal relief turned in a portrait lathe to become a steel hub.

 

 

Gem

Definition:

An adjective that the A.N.A. applies to coins which grade Mint State or Proof-67. Most dealers, however, apply the adjective to any coin which they grade MS/Proof-65.

 

 

Gem BU

Definition:

Synonym for Gem Brilliant Uncirculated.

 

 

Gem Uncirculated

Definition:

See Gem.

 

 

Good

Definition:

The grades G-4 and G-6.

 

 

Grade

Definition:

The numerical or adjectival condition of a coin.

 

 

Grader

Definition:

A person who evaluates the condition of coins.

 

 

Grading

Definition:

The process of numerically quantifying the condition of a coin.

 

 

Hair

Definition:

The area of a coin that represents hair and may be an important aspect of the grade.

 

 

Hairlines

Definition:

Thin, shallow scratches on the surface of a coin, usually caused by improper cleaning, or mishandling. Hairlines are found on virtually all proof coins, and are considered the most important single factor in grading high quality proof coins. They sometimes appear on business strikes as well. Hairlines tend to show up more often on proof-like business strikes.

 

 

Hammer die

Definition:

The upper die that is non-stationary. While usually the obverse, on some issues with striking problems, the reverse was employed as the hammer die.

Also see: Anvil die

 

 

Haze

Definition:

A cloudy film seen on business-strike coins and Proofs. It may occur naturally or be added.

 

 

High end

Definition:

A term applied to any coin at the upper end of a particular grade.

Also see: Premium quality

 

 

High Relief

Definition:

A coin with deep concave fields, due to its design. High relief coins required extra pressure to be fully struck, and were difficult to stack. Therefore, the few coins struck in high relief by the U.S. Mint (such as the 1921 Peace dollar and the 1907 Roman Numerals double eagle) were each made for only one year.

 

 

Hoard

Definition:

A group of coins held for either numismatic or monetary reasons.

 

 

Hoard coin

Definition:

A coin that exists, or existed, in a quantity held by an individual, organization, etc. Examples include Stone Mountain half dollars still held by the Daughters of the Confederacy.

 

 

Hoarder

Definition:

An individual who amasses a great quantity of a numismatic item.

 

 

Holder toning

Definition:

Any toning acquired by a coin as a result of storage in a holder.

 

 

Hub

Definition:

Minting term for the steel device that is used to produce a die.

 

 

ICG

Definition:

Independent Coin Grading Company is a grading service located in Englewood, CO.

 

 

Impaired Proof

Definition:

A Proof coin that grades lower than PR-60.

Also see: Mishandled Proof

 

 

Incomplete strike

Definition:

A coin that is missing design detail because of a problem during the striking process. An incomplete strike may be due to insufficient striking pressure or improperly spaced dies.

 

 

Incuse design

Definition:

The intaglio design used on Indian Head quarter eagles and half eagles. The devices on these coins were recessed to try and deter counterfeiting and improve durability.

 

 

Intrinsic value

Definition:

The value of the metal(s) contained in a numismatic item. The United States issues contained their intrinsic value in metal until 1933 for gold coins and 1964 for silver coins. Modern U.S. coins are termed fiat currency (see Fiat currency).

 

 

Iridescent

Definition:

Probably the most desirable form of toning on a silver or nickel coin. Iridescent toning covers virtually all of the coin’s surface, while still permitting all of the coin’s natural lustre to shine through with its full intensity.

 

 

Did You Know?

198225c MergedEven though the 1982 & 1983 P&D Washington quartrrs were minted in the hundreds of millions, finding a gem, mint state issue of each of these four coins will prove to be a tough task. This is because the US Mint did not produce mint uncirculated coin set for these years. Instead, the mint sold mint souvenir sets which were only available on location in the mint gift shops. This has lead to significantly fewer uncirculated examples available for all four business strikes from these years.